Beechwood Park - History

In February 1900 the Newport Council proposed to purchase the 22 acre Beechwood Estate, Maindee, for the sum of approximately £11,000 in order to provide a public park in that area. The estate included a mansion, Beechwood House, in the centre of the property and the Council at this stage had no proposal for its use.[1][2]

By April 1900 the Council had acquired the estate and proposed to convert the mansion to refreshment rooms.[3] In May the Parks Committee and other Council members made a visit to inspect the new public park:[4] "Those who had not paid a prior visit to the newest possession of the ratepayers were agreeably surprised at the beauty, completeness, and variety of the new park. The approach from Chepstow-road discloses a fine avenue of well-grown beeches, down the centre of which is a dingle, with plenty of possibilities of development in the shape of rustic bridges, miniature waterfalls, fish ponds etc. The main drive is planted with a fine selection of ornamental trees, which have made good growth, and are just now putting on the delicate tints of spring foliage. The house itself is a well-built freestone faced residence, built by the late Mr. Fothergill, one of the chief magistrates of the Borough, and the views from the balcony and French windows of the lower floor over the alluvial lands to the brown Severn sea and the distant hills of Somerset as a background, are very fine."

The 1920 Ordnance Survey map shows the main entrance at the north west corner of the park, off what is now Christchurch Road, with a tree-lined drive leading to the house. A second entrance is shown at the north east, near the corner where Christchurch Road and Beechwood Road meet.

In 1912 the Parks and Cemeteries Committee approved a plan from the Waterworks Committee to build a storage reservoir in the park and requested that the work be carried out such that games could be played on top of and around the reservoir.[5] In March 1913 it was reported that baseball was played occasionally in the park.[6]

An additional entrance was made in May 1914, when a new bridge was built over the dingle running parallel to Beechwood Road. The Parks Committee decided that a gate be installed in the fence alongside Beechwood Road, opposite the new bridge. A quotation from Messrs Abbott & Baker to supply the gate at a price of £4-7s-6d was accepted.[7]

The Parks Committee inspected Beechwood Park in August 1917 and decided upon the following improvements:

The report of the inspection also mentioned children's swings but not indicating where in the park these were.[8] The Committee carried out a further inspection in August 1918 and agreed the following improvements:

During the 1914-18 war Beechwood House was loaned to the Welsh National Memorial Association for use as a sanatorium.[9] After the war a captured German gun was placed in the park and in July 1920 it was decided that this gun be cleaned and painted.[10] In September 1920 the Parks Committee visited the park and specified where the captured German gun should be placed.[11]

In 1923 the Parks Committee expressed interest in acquiring from the Housing Committee a small piece of land on the Maindee Park estate bordering Beechwood Road, which could be added to Beechwood Park and provide an additional entrance.[12] It was agreed in May 1924 that this area of about 4½ acres would be acquired for the sum of £880.[13] In January 1925 the Parks Committee agreed to plant some trees along the Beechwood Road frontage of this land at an estimated cost of about £13.[14] The total cost of laying out the new space, including fencing and gates, would be about £2,050.[15] In April a tender was accepted from Mr Herbert Wreford for the erection of new entrance gates, pillars, walls and railings at a cost of £735-11s.[16] The following month the Committee awarded another contract to Mr Wreford for the construction of roads, drains etc. worth £1,265-8s-10d.[17]

The Borough Engineer reported in June 1925 that the laying out of the new section of the park and the erection of entrance gates and fencing were in progress. He also submitted a plan of a proposed bridge over the ravine costing £90 which was approved by the Parks Committee.[18] The extension to the park was officially opened by the Mayor on the 22nd October 1925.[19]

In June 1926 the Parks Committee accepted an offer from the contractor making roads on the Maindee Park housing site, to tip material to fill in the lower portion of the dingle in the new part of the park.[20] Some planting took place in the extension in early 1929, the Parks Superintendent having been authorised to order about 120 shrubs for this purpose.[21] A set of six swings, ordered from C. Wicksteed & Co. in February 1930,[22] were probably placed in the new part of the park, as a playground appears there alongside Beechwood Road on later Ordnance Survey maps. Further work to fill in the dingle was authorised in October 1933 at a cost of about £25.[23] In December 1935 the lower part of the dingle was being prepared for planting with various plants and shrubs and would include two shallow ponds for water lilies.[24]

In the older part of the park a kiosk and shelter was added at the north east entrance in 1926 following a request from the Borough Electrical Engineer.[25] In September 1932 the Parks Committee decided that the ground in front of Beechwood House would be converted into a rose garden.[26] In October 1935 a tender was accepted from Mr J. H. Williams for a greenhouse at the price of £229.[27] This was most probably on the west side of Beechwood House, where a number of glasshouses are shown on Ordnance Survey maps for the 1930s and later.

The Parks Committee decided in November 1935 that the German gun would be removed to another (unspecified) position in the park.[28]

In September 1938 trenches were dug in a number of Newport parks, including in Beechwood Park, as a civil defence measure recommended by the Home Office.[29] The Parks Committee decided that the trench(es) in Beechwood Park would be camouflaged and protected by planting shrubs and flower borders around them.[30] The Parks Superintendent reported in January 1940 that the areas around the ARP trenches would shortly be planted with shrubs, and rustic screens would be erected near the entrances.[31]

During the 1939-45 War the military authorities occupied areas of the park, as described on a separate page.

Sources of Information

  1. Western Mail Thursday February 1st 1900 page 7
  2. South Wales Daily News Thursday February 1st 1900 page 3
  3. South Wales Daily News Wednesday April 11th 1900 page 3
  4. South Wales Daily News Tuesday May 8th 1900 page 6
  5. Newport County Borough Council Parks and Cemeteries Committee 3rd October 1912
  6. Newport County Borough Council Parks and Cemeteries Committee 19th March 1913
  7. Newport County Borough Council Parks and Cemeteries Committee 15th May 1914
  8. Newport County Borough Council Parks and Cemeteries Committee 23rd August 1917
  9. Newport County Borough Council Parks and Cemeteries Committee 16th July 1915
  10. Newport County Borough Council Parks and Cemeteries Committee 16th July 1920
  11. Newport County Borough Council Parks and Cemeteries Committee 1st September 1920
  12. Newport County Borough Council Parks and Cemeteries Committee 28th September 1923
  13. Newport County Borough Council Parks and Cemeteries Committee 3rd May 1924
  14. Newport County Borough Council Parks and Cemeteries Committee 9th January 1925
  15. Newport County Borough Council Parks and Cemeteries Committee 23rd February 1925
  16. Newport County Borough Council Parks and Cemeteries Committee 16th April 1925
  17. Newport County Borough Council Parks and Cemeteries Committee 25th May 1925
  18. Newport County Borough Council Parks and Cemeteries Committee 26th June 1925
  19. Newport County Borough Council Parks and Cemeteries Committee 25th September 1925, 23rd October 1925
  20. Newport County Borough Council Parks and Cemeteries Committee 25th June 1926
  21. Newport County Borough Council Parks and Cemeteries Committee 25th January 1929
  22. Newport County Borough Council Parks and Cemeteries Committee 21st February 1930
  23. Newport County Borough Council Parks and Cemeteries Committee 20th October 1933
  24. Newport County Borough Council Parks and Cemeteries Committee 20th December 1935
  25. Newport County Borough Council Parks and Cemeteries Committee 14th September 1926
  26. Newport County Borough Council Parks and Cemeteries Committee 26th September 1932
  27. Newport County Borough Council Parks and Cemeteries Committee 18th October 1935
  28. Newport County Borough Council Parks and Cemeteries Committee 15th November 1935
  29. Newport County Borough Council Parks and Cemeteries Committee 29th September 1938
  30. Newport County Borough Council Parks and Cemeteries Committee 18th November 1938
  31. Newport County Borough Council Parks and Cemeteries Committee 19th January 1940